Newsletter Archives > ChiroPlanet.com Monthly Health Newsletter: September 2016 Health Newsletter

September 2016 Health Newsletter


Current Articles

» Are Stimulants Stealing Your Energy?
» Dehydration & Your Brain
» Cashew Cookie "Larabar"
» Heat-Related Sports Injuries: When Athletes Are At Greatest Risk
» Are Trampoline Parks Safe for Kids?
» Preventing Severe Traumatic Brain Injuries: Proof That Bike Helmets Really Work

Are Stimulants Stealing Your Energy?

modified excerpt by Kelly Hayford C.N.C., provided by the ICPA

 

All stimulants or extreme foods send your body's chemistry soaring out of balance, then crashing in the opposite direction in an effort to restore balance. The sound and image of a bomb dropping—phhheeeeeeoooow -- BOOM!—is the best way to describe what take place in the body when stimulants are comsumed. This is a good thing to keep in mind when deciding whether or not to indulge in them. And the reason the second Eating-for-Health Guideline is: eliminate or relegate stimulants to rare occasions...the more distant and rare the better.

In terms of foods and beverages, stimulants include, but are not limited to:

  • Sugars—including refined carbohydrates (high fructose corn syrup, white refined flour, etc.) and all other concentrated sweeteners

  • Refined Salt
  • Caffeine & Chocolate
  • Alcohol & Tobacco
  • Some food additives, such as MSG and artificial sweeteners

These extreme substances are anti-nutrients that act more like drugs than food in the body. They're nototiously addictive in nature and the biggest thieves of your energy and mental clarity. Stimulants also hijack your taste buds, cause unnatural cravings and lead to cronic conditions ranging from mild to severe. Some of the many problems associated with stimulants include: arthritis / inflammation, lowered immune function, fatigue / adrenal exhaustion, insomnia, anxiety / depression, PMS/menopausal issues, cancer / heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, sinusitis / allergies, tooth decay, kidney & liver problem, hypoglycemia, digestive disturbances, candida (yeast over growth) and headaches. If that's not reason enough to eliminate stimulants altogether or only have them on rare occasions, I don't know what is!

People frequently dismiss the notion of cutting out the extreme foods in their diet because they mistakenly believe they're providing energy. When in fact, the stimulants are what's making you increasingly tired in the first place. And the more you depend on them, the worst it gets.

Although the concept of elminating stimulants from your diet is pretty simple, because they're so addictive, doing so is often not that easy. In fact, out of all the guidelines this may be the most difficult to implement. Starting with the more prevalent stimulant in your diet is frequently the best place to start. And for most people in the North America today, that means sugar.

 

Author: Power
Source: April 2016 Newsletter
Copyright: Power Health 2016


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Dehydration & Your Brain

When you are feeling tired and sluggish it is crucial to determine if you are suffering from dehydration. 

Even mild dehydration diminishes your power to process new information, your memory recall, affects your mood and may cause headaches. You may notice you feel tired and struggle to concentrate on the task at hand. This happens because your body is very sensitive to changes in ions such as sodium and potassium in body fluids. Sever or chronic dehydration can result in shrinking of the brain tissues.

A study from the University of Connecticut showed that when dehydrated you will perceive mental tasks to be more difficult even if your performance doesn't suffer. Research also shows that your brain will expend more energy to complete a task when dehydrated.

Dr. Chelsea recommends we drink a letre of water for every 50 pounds of body weight.

Examine your urine colour—it should be very pale yellow. Darker urine is a sign of dehydration.

Remember that by the time you are feeling thirsty you are already dehydrated. And keep in mind that sometimes what we intrepret as hunger is actually thirst.

Keep a water bottle with you throughout your day - this goes for little ones too!

Author: Power Health
Source: April 2016 Newsletter
Copyright: Power Health 2016


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Cashew Cookie "Larabar"

Check out this recipe from 100 Days of Real Food, an easy snack made of real food to throw in your bag, office, or backpack. This recipe is a nice flexable back for creating other flavour combinations. Add some dried fruit, cacao nibs or seeds—whatever you have on hand.

http://www.100daysofrealfood.com/2012/07/01/recipe-homemade-larabars-4-ways-including-nut-free/

 

Author: Lisa Leake
Source: 100 Days of Real Food
Copyright: 100 Days of Real Food 2016


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Heat-Related Sports Injuries: When Athletes Are At Greatest Risk

Football season for high school and college students typically starts in September, one of the hottest months of the year around the US. A recent study conducted at the University of Georgia found that the likelihood of heat-related injury in athletes increased exponentially during this time of year. 

2 Times When the Risk of Sports Injuries Are the Highest

According to the study, researchers found that there were two times during training when athletes were at the highest risk for injuries.
 •  Within the first 3 to 14 days of practice, but the rate was much higher during the first three days
 •  On days seven and eight of pre-season training when athletes began practicing twice each day. 

Seventy-four percent of the college athletes evaluated suffered from heat cramps, while 26 percent suffered from a combination of heat syncope (fainting) and heat exhaustion. The highest risk came when outdoor temperatures were greater than 82 degrees. 

Common Symptoms of Heat-Related Sports Injuries

Coaches, trainers, parents and athletes should all be on the lookout for injuries related to higher temperatures. Symptoms include: 
 •  Heat Cramps: Involuntary spasms within the larger muscle groups. 
 •  Heat Exhaustion: Heat cramps, copious sweating, nausea, vomiting, headache and weakness. 
 •  Heat Stroke: Headache, rapid heart rate and breathing, nausea, vomiting, and altered behavior or mental state. 

Chiropractors: Helping Prevent Heat-Related Injury in Athletes

Chiropractors, as well as sports trainers, play an important role in preventing sports injuries during the summer training period. They can educate athletes on the importance of adequate hydration and rest. Additionally, they can demonstrate relaxation and flexibility techniques that can be used to relieve muscle spasms. When athletes and their sports medicine team, including chiropractors, work together they can prevent injuries and have a productive and healthy football season.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Journal of Athletic Training, online August 9, 2016.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2016


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Are Trampoline Parks Safe for Kids?

When a new trampoline park opens up, emergency rooms and pediatric centers nearby are sure to notice an increase in related injuries. The safety concerns of trampolines are no secret, accounting for over 100,000 injuries each year.1  These injuries can range from mild to severe, from sprains and bruises to life-threatening spine and neck injuries. There's even a recoil injury doctors are all-too-familiar with: it’s called a "trampoline fracture," which is a tibial fracture commonly caused by having more than one jumper on a trampoline at once.2 Bur recent research illustrates that trampoline parks create even more risk than their standalone counterparts. First, they are built to accommodate many jumpers, and although parks' rules dictate only one jumper per "section," these rules are often broken. The hard supports between sectioned components of the trampolines themselves pose a serious risk as well, and they are common culprits for high-impact injuries after a fall.  At trampoline parks, jumpers are more likely to collide with others, more likely to sustain dislocations, and more likely to require hospital admission than jumpers on home trampolines.3  If a child is going to jump on a trampoline, practicing good safety skills like supervised, netted jumping with only one jumper at a time, as well as appropriately managing any injuries in the event of an accident, is the best way to keep safe them during these activities. And over half of injuries sustained from trampoline activities are soft tissue injuries,4 highlighting the importance of proper injury treatment and care.  For non-life threatening spinal and soft tissue injuries, treatment by a doctor of chiropractic is an excellent, effective, and safe way to heal an injury, strengthen the body, and protect from re-injury.
References: 
1. http://www.livestrong.com/article/347980-statistics-on-trampoline-injuries/
2. http://radiopaedia.org/articles/trampoline-fracture
3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27482060
4. http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/early/2016/07/28/injuryprev-2016-042071

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/early/2016/07/28/injuryprev-2016-042071
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2016


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Preventing Severe Traumatic Brain Injuries: Proof That Bike Helmets Really Work

There has been a debate over the years about whether bike helmets really do that much to prevent injuries. Advocates claim that wearing a helmet while riding a bike can save lives. Skeptics, however, don’t think that this type of protective gear does that much to prevent head injuries, let alone death.  Recently, a study was conducted at the University of Arizona to determine just how effective helmet protection really was for riders.

3 Ways Bike Helmets Protect Riders

During the course of this study, over 6000 bike accident patients were evaluated. Researchers found that helmets did, in fact, protect riders in three important ways. Helmets protected riders from: 
1. Severe Traumatic Brain Injures (TBIs)
2. Facial fractures
3. Death, even after a brain hemorrhage.

The Great Debate: The Numbers Prove That Helmets Are Beneficial

The figures gathered during this study are proof that helmets do a good job of protecting riders. For instance, wearing a helmet reduced the odds of severe traumatic brain injuries by over 50 percent. The likelihood of death after a bike accident was reduced by almost 45 percent in helmeted riders. And, these riders were over 30 percent less likely to experience facial fractures.  While not all helmeted riders are going to avoid traumatic brain injuries after an accident, helmets can reduce the probability of severe injury and death. The numbers speak for themselves; helmets do much to protect the rider. 

Chiropractors Can Be Strong Advocates for Rider Protection

Chiropractors are promoters of health and want to do all they can to help their patients live a happy, injury-free lifestyle. One of the ways they do this is by educating their patients on injury prevention, which includes the use of bike helmets.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: The American Journal of Surgery, online July 29, 2016
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2016


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