Newsletter Archives > Monthly Health Newsletter: June 2016 Health Newsletter

June 2016 Health Newsletter

Current Articles

» Are Stimulants Stealing Your Energy?
» Dehydration & Your Brain
» Cashew Cookie "Larabar"
» June is Scoliosis Awareness Month
» Superbugs and the Importance of a Healthy Lifestyle
» The Cost of Smoking (Even if You Don't Smoke)

Are Stimulants Stealing Your Energy?

modified excerpt by Kelly Hayford C.N.C., provided by the ICPA


All stimulants or extreme foods send your body's chemistry soaring out of balance, then crashing in the opposite direction in an effort to restore balance. The sound and image of a bomb dropping—phhheeeeeeoooow -- BOOM!—is the best way to describe what take place in the body when stimulants are comsumed. This is a good thing to keep in mind when deciding whether or not to indulge in them. And the reason the second Eating-for-Health Guideline is: eliminate or relegate stimulants to rare occasions...the more distant and rare the better.

In terms of foods and beverages, stimulants include, but are not limited to:

  • Sugars—including refined carbohydrates (high fructose corn syrup, white refined flour, etc.) and all other concentrated sweeteners

  • Refined Salt
  • Caffeine & Chocolate
  • Alcohol & Tobacco
  • Some food additives, such as MSG and artificial sweeteners

These extreme substances are anti-nutrients that act more like drugs than food in the body. They're nototiously addictive in nature and the biggest thieves of your energy and mental clarity. Stimulants also hijack your taste buds, cause unnatural cravings and lead to cronic conditions ranging from mild to severe. Some of the many problems associated with stimulants include: arthritis / inflammation, lowered immune function, fatigue / adrenal exhaustion, insomnia, anxiety / depression, PMS/menopausal issues, cancer / heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, sinusitis / allergies, tooth decay, kidney & liver problem, hypoglycemia, digestive disturbances, candida (yeast over growth) and headaches. If that's not reason enough to eliminate stimulants altogether or only have them on rare occasions, I don't know what is!

People frequently dismiss the notion of cutting out the extreme foods in their diet because they mistakenly believe they're providing energy. When in fact, the stimulants are what's making you increasingly tired in the first place. And the more you depend on them, the worst it gets.

Although the concept of elminating stimulants from your diet is pretty simple, because they're so addictive, doing so is often not that easy. In fact, out of all the guidelines this may be the most difficult to implement. Starting with the more prevalent stimulant in your diet is frequently the best place to start. And for most people in the North America today, that means sugar.


Author: Power
Source: April 2016 Newsletter
Copyright: Power Health 2016

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Dehydration & Your Brain

When you are feeling tired and sluggish it is crucial to determine if you are suffering from dehydration. 

Even mild dehydration diminishes your power to process new information, your memory recall, affects your mood and may cause headaches. You may notice you feel tired and struggle to concentrate on the task at hand. This happens because your body is very sensitive to changes in ions such as sodium and potassium in body fluids. Sever or chronic dehydration can result in shrinking of the brain tissues.

A study from the University of Connecticut showed that when dehydrated you will perceive mental tasks to be more difficult even if your performance doesn't suffer. Research also shows that your brain will expend more energy to complete a task when dehydrated.

Dr. Chelsea recommends we drink a letre of water for every 50 pounds of body weight.

Examine your urine colour—it should be very pale yellow. Darker urine is a sign of dehydration.

Remember that by the time you are feeling thirsty you are already dehydrated. And keep in mind that sometimes what we intrepret as hunger is actually thirst.

Keep a water bottle with you throughout your day - this goes for little ones too!

Author: Power Health
Source: April 2016 Newsletter
Copyright: Power Health 2016

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Cashew Cookie "Larabar"

Check out this recipe from 100 Days of Real Food, an easy snack made of real food to throw in your bag, office, or backpack. This recipe is a nice flexable back for creating other flavour combinations. Add some dried fruit, cacao nibs or seeds—whatever you have on hand.


Author: Lisa Leake
Source: 100 Days of Real Food
Copyright: 100 Days of Real Food 2016

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June is Scoliosis Awareness Month

With the arrival of summer, June also heralds the start of Scoliosis Awareness Month. The Scoliosis Research Society declared this month a key time to focus on detection and early treatment for this condition, which affects nearly 3% of Americans. Typically detected between the ages of 10 and 15, scoliosis is characterized by an abnormal lateral (sideways) curvature of the spine. Curvature can range from mild to severe, and may cause pain, low self-esteem, and in severe cases, issues with movement or breathing. In children, bones are still growing and developing, which presents an opportunity to prevent further progression of scoliosis with a back brace. For teens and adults, however, the adult bone structure has set, and braces are not common interventions.

Early detection of scoliosis is the very best way to minimize progression of spinal curvature or the need for surgery later on. Methods of detection can include in-school screenings, regular pediatric physical exams, and evaluations by a DC (Doctor of Chiropractic). In fact, DCs can play an important role in both detection and treatment for scoliosis. In a study published in the Journal of Chiropractic Medicine, adults with moderate-severe scoliosis enrolled in an exercise-based chiropractic treatment program saw significant improvements after six months. Not only did more than 75 percent of participants experience reduced Cobb angles (decreased curvature), but pain and disability scores also improved and maintained this improvement even after a two-year follow-up.

Chiropractic treatment shows promise for non-surgical and non-invasive treatments for scoliosis. June is a key time to raise awareness about the importance of scoliosis detection and treatment, and advances in non-surgical alternatives such as chiropractic treatment are offering individuals with this condition more options than ever to manage scoliosis safely and effectively, and improve their quality of life.

Source: National Scoliosis Foundation (NSF)
Copyright: LLC 2016

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Superbugs and the Importance of a Healthy Lifestyle

For years, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, or "superbugs," have raised growing concerns both inside the medical industry and out. These discussions have lead to increased awareness about unnecessary antibiotics use as a significant contributor to this resistance. Despite this, the widespread use of antibiotics in both humans and agriculture, and inadequate research on new antibiotics, has resulted in more antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria.

Last month, the American Society for Microbiology reported a bacterial infection within the United States that was resistant to even the strongest antibiotics. "The recent discovery of a plasmid-borne colistin resistance gene, mcr-1, heralds the emergence of truly pan-drug resistant bacteria," wrote the researchers. Such bacteria have also been found in Europe and elsewhere, highlighting the importance of a global-scale focus on research and minimization of antibiotics use. But individuals are also called upon to lead healthy, active lifestyles to do their part. Healthy individuals with strong immune systems are more likely to fight off infections without antibiotics and less likely to spread infections to others. Maintaining individual health can help bolster health at the population level, protecting large groups of people from the effects of resistant strains of bacteria.

Source: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy Online; May 26, 2016.
Copyright: LLC 2016

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The Cost of Smoking (Even if You Don't Smoke)

In 1964, news that lung cancer was linked to smoking hit the masses. Since then, smoking rates have halved, but it is nevertheless still taking a serious toll. According to research from the University of California San Francisco, states are still spending millions (or even billions) of healthcare dollars on smoking. The researchers compiled their data into an interactive map, which displays how much money states spent or saved on smoking in 2009. California, for example, saved over $15 billion that year alone. Kentucky, on the other hand, has smoking rates higher than the national average and spent approximately $1.7 billion.

While these numbers are yet another important public health reminder about the costs of smoking, the researchers' underlying message can be extrapolated to other areas of healthcare as well. Leading healthy, active lifestyles can cut healthcare costs enormously from many different angles. For example, obesity-related health care in 2005 cost the United States $190 billion. Pursuing good health is not just beneficial for the individual; it drives down overall healthcare costs for an entire population and helps set the stage for a happier, healthier society.

Source: PLOS Medicine, online May 10, 2016.
Copyright: LLC 2016

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