Newsletter Archives > Monthly Health Newsletter: April 2016 Health Newsletter

April 2016 Health Newsletter

Current Articles

» Are Stimulants Stealing Your Energy?
» Dehydration & Your Brain
» Cashew Cookie "Larabar"
» Chiropractic Care Shown To Be Cost Effective
» Obesity Grows Around The World
» Research Says Fitness Trackers May Not Be Accurate

Are Stimulants Stealing Your Energy?

modified excerpt by Kelly Hayford C.N.C., provided by the ICPA


All stimulants or extreme foods send your body's chemistry soaring out of balance, then crashing in the opposite direction in an effort to restore balance. The sound and image of a bomb dropping—phhheeeeeeoooow -- BOOM!—is the best way to describe what take place in the body when stimulants are comsumed. This is a good thing to keep in mind when deciding whether or not to indulge in them. And the reason the second Eating-for-Health Guideline is: eliminate or relegate stimulants to rare occasions...the more distant and rare the better.

In terms of foods and beverages, stimulants include, but are not limited to:

  • Sugars—including refined carbohydrates (high fructose corn syrup, white refined flour, etc.) and all other concentrated sweeteners

  • Refined Salt
  • Caffeine & Chocolate
  • Alcohol & Tobacco
  • Some food additives, such as MSG and artificial sweeteners

These extreme substances are anti-nutrients that act more like drugs than food in the body. They're nototiously addictive in nature and the biggest thieves of your energy and mental clarity. Stimulants also hijack your taste buds, cause unnatural cravings and lead to cronic conditions ranging from mild to severe. Some of the many problems associated with stimulants include: arthritis / inflammation, lowered immune function, fatigue / adrenal exhaustion, insomnia, anxiety / depression, PMS/menopausal issues, cancer / heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, sinusitis / allergies, tooth decay, kidney & liver problem, hypoglycemia, digestive disturbances, candida (yeast over growth) and headaches. If that's not reason enough to eliminate stimulants altogether or only have them on rare occasions, I don't know what is!

People frequently dismiss the notion of cutting out the extreme foods in their diet because they mistakenly believe they're providing energy. When in fact, the stimulants are what's making you increasingly tired in the first place. And the more you depend on them, the worst it gets.

Although the concept of elminating stimulants from your diet is pretty simple, because they're so addictive, doing so is often not that easy. In fact, out of all the guidelines this may be the most difficult to implement. Starting with the more prevalent stimulant in your diet is frequently the best place to start. And for most people in the North America today, that means sugar.


Author: Power
Source: April 2016 Newsletter
Copyright: Power Health 2016

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Dehydration & Your Brain

When you are feeling tired and sluggish it is crucial to determine if you are suffering from dehydration. 

Even mild dehydration diminishes your power to process new information, your memory recall, affects your mood and may cause headaches. You may notice you feel tired and struggle to concentrate on the task at hand. This happens because your body is very sensitive to changes in ions such as sodium and potassium in body fluids. Sever or chronic dehydration can result in shrinking of the brain tissues.

A study from the University of Connecticut showed that when dehydrated you will perceive mental tasks to be more difficult even if your performance doesn't suffer. Research also shows that your brain will expend more energy to complete a task when dehydrated.

Dr. Chelsea recommends we drink a letre of water for every 50 pounds of body weight.

Examine your urine colour—it should be very pale yellow. Darker urine is a sign of dehydration.

Remember that by the time you are feeling thirsty you are already dehydrated. And keep in mind that sometimes what we intrepret as hunger is actually thirst.

Keep a water bottle with you throughout your day - this goes for little ones too!

Author: Power Health
Source: April 2016 Newsletter
Copyright: Power Health 2016

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Cashew Cookie "Larabar"

Check out this recipe from 100 Days of Real Food, an easy snack made of real food to throw in your bag, office, or backpack. This recipe is a nice flexable back for creating other flavour combinations. Add some dried fruit, cacao nibs or seeds—whatever you have on hand.


Author: Lisa Leake
Source: 100 Days of Real Food
Copyright: 100 Days of Real Food 2016

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Chiropractic Care Shown To Be Cost Effective

Looking for effective, safe and affordable care to treat those aches and pains? New research indicates chiropractic care could be the answer. A group of scientists recently published a study to determine whether chiropractic treatment was linked with lower healthcare costs for older patients with low back pain. The study looked at more than 72,000 patients ages 66 and older to determine whether chiropractic treatment was a good option. The results determined that older patients who used chiropractic therapy for lower back pain had lower overall healthcare costs along with shorter pain episodes. The cost of care per episode day was also lower. Those who combined convention medical care with chiropractic care also saw lower costs of care. Interestingly, the cost of treatment was higher for people who did not use any chiropractic treatment at all. The findings show that chiropractic care alone or used in conjunction with other forms of care are a cost effective, viable method for those who want to manage and lessen their pain.

Source: JMPT February 2016 Volume 39, Issue 2, Pages 63–75.
Copyright: LLC 2016

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Obesity Grows Around The World

In early 2016, the global population totaled more than 640 million obese people. These new totals now show that more than half the world is overweight. This increase in obesity means that one in seven women and one in 10 men are obese, with a body mass index of more than 30 (overweight is 25). During the last 40 years, the average male BMI has risen from 21.7 to 24.2 while females saw a rise from 22.1 to 24.4. That totals to an average of 3.3 pounds gained per decade. The study looked at almost 20 million adults worldwide. It's an epidemic that has seen worldwide attention as countries address food labeling practices, food pricing, taxes on unhealthy foods, and government nutrition recommendations. At the same time, many of the world's poorest are underweight, suffering from a lack of food. Obesity can have both health and economic effects. As healthcare costs rise, problems due to an unhealthy weight can affect the economic stability of millions of households. But it doesn't have to be this way. Leading a healthy lifestyle with plenty of exercise and a smart diet can allow you to live a longer and better life.

Source: Reuters, online March 31, 2016.
Copyright: LLC 2016

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Research Says Fitness Trackers May Not Be Accurate

Fitness trackers are exploding in popularity, tracking everything from heart rate to steps taken. But a new study from the National Institute of Health and Nutrition in Tokyo shows that this technology isn't always accurate at tracking energy expenditure. Researchers tested 12 fitness trackers against current methods of detecting energy expenditure. The results suggest that these trackers can both under and overestimate energy expenditure, sometimes by hundreds of calories. Some devices underestimated calories burned by almost 600 calories while others overestimated by around 200. Researchers say it is possible the trackers are inaccurate due to people taking them off during the day. For people who use fitness trackers to make health decisions based on fitness level, both over and underestimates can be harmful. Those trying to lose weight could be actually burning too few calories. Those watching their activity levels due to heart problems may be too active. There’s not much research on trackers yet, and devices could vary from brand to brand. Either way, people using fitness trackers to make health decisions should be cautious about relying too much on device data.

Source: JAMA Internal Medicine, online March 21, 2016.
Copyright: LLC 2016

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